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About Us

TXGLC provides educational opportunities for many groups, including wildlife and livestock organizations and schools. We collaborate and cooperate with our partners to provide meaningful information to land stewards and others. Grazing lands include rangeland and pasture land and make up more than 100 million acres, 65% of Texas!
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Useful Resources

Links to valuable info on grazing lands. Videos, publications, websites of interest to grazing land stewards.
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Events & Activities

Calendar and information on upcoming events!
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Contact Us Today

Find our regional coalitions, grazing specialists, officers and board members in your area!
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Private grazing lands
make up nearly

0%

of the land area in Texas.

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Texas Grazing Land Coalition is a 501 (c) 3 non-profit. TXGLC supports sound grazing land stewardship and assists owners and managers of private grazing lands. We actively seek grants to help us educate land owners, explore and publicize meaningful issues/topics for land stewards. Join our efforts! Send contributions to TXGLC, Box 146, Victoria, TX 77902! Interested in a particular area: specify your contribution to go to our youth or adult education, state wide grazing land information programs or your regional Grazing Land Coalition. Saddle up and ride with us today!
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1 day ago

Texas Grazing Land Coalition

Internships for students on the land are so incredibly valuable! Kudos to our colleagues at East Foundation for utilizing this kind of education!

#ArtOfGrazing
#AmazingGrazing
#LandscapeLearningLegacy runs deep in south Texas, especially for Ryan Lopez, one of our summer interns on the San Antonio Viejo.

As an East Foundation intern, I have had the privilege to participate in an extraordinary array of the Foundation’s operations, ranging from Nilgai captures, vegetation data work, and just about every aspect of their cattle operations. As a Wildlife Biology major at Texas Tech University, I came into this internship with an open mind about cattle production, despite my educational background being strictly wildlife related. I; like many, have always seen cattle and wildlife management as two separate entities. However, the East Foundation has shown me firsthand how wildlife and cattle management are intertwined and go hand in hand with one another. I hope to incorporate this into my career as a Ranch Manager after college. Many years ago, my great grandfather Antonio Morante, and my great-great grandfather Esteban Morante, both worked as vaqueros for Robert East. I am very honored and proud to have followed in their footsteps. My favorite aspect of the internship is the people I’ve met and the relationships I’ve made with the great staff that the East Foundation has built its name on. The East Foundation, for me, has been a place where lessons are learned, and traditions are carried on.
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Internships for students on the land are so incredibly valuable!  Kudos to our colleagues at East Foundation for utilizing this kind of education!

#ArtOfGrazing
#AmazingGrazing
#LandscapeLearningImage attachmentImage attachment

We met “Bonnie” Texas A&M Agrilife’s blue quail yesterday at the #twaconvention. She does not call on command like Kirby the bobwhite who they bring sometimes, but she’s pretty friendly! ... See MoreSee Less

TWA Convention! After hearing scientists and government advice (You need to do this! You must have this many pastures! You can pay for this with double stocking rates! Etc, etc.....), TXGLC’s Frank S Price offered the crowd some practical, actually useful to the rancher/landowner suggestions! “Rotational Grazing is important. You may not have 16 pastures. Just get started with what you have! It may be four pastures. Just get started.” And perhaps the best advice of all: “It took us 8 years to get our stocking rate increased.”

Many landowners, especially absentee landowners, are simply not equipped or are overwhelmed at the thought of intensive grazing management. Thus they do nothing. Continuing the continuous grazing that has been practiced for years and contributes to the degradation of rangeland.

Grazing is a tool but the rancher does not need to start with a toolbox rivaling an oil field machine shop!

Like many things in life, be it the diet your doc wants you to start or that exercise program you know you should do: “Just get started!!

#twaconvention
#ArtOfGrazing
#LessonsFromFrank
... See MoreSee Less

TWA Convention!  After hearing scientists and government advice (You need to do this!  You must have this many pastures! You can pay for this with double stocking rates!  Etc, etc.....), TXGLC’s Frank S Price offered the crowd some practical, actually useful to the rancher/landowner suggestions!  “Rotational Grazing is important.  You may not have 16 pastures.  Just get started with what you have! It may be four pastures.  Just get started.”  And perhaps the best advice of all:  “It took us 8 years to get our stocking rate increased.”  

Many landowners, especially absentee landowners, are simply not equipped or are overwhelmed at the thought of intensive grazing management.  Thus they do nothing.  Continuing the continuous grazing that has been practiced for years and contributes to the degradation of rangeland.

Grazing is a tool but the rancher does not need to start with a toolbox rivaling an oil field machine shop!  

Like many things in life, be it the diet your doc wants you to start or that exercise program you know you should do:  “Just get started!! 

#twaconvention
#ArtOfGrazing
#LessonsFromFrank

 

Comment on Facebook

I believe it is just as bad to remove all grazing animals and have no grazing at all. Your land will go backwards and you will end up in the same place as with continuous grazing.

Amen!!!

Well said!

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